Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre

Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre


Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)

August 09, 2021

The common tendency when experiencing trials is to wonder if we are suffering for sin. When Difficult situations occur we wonder what we did to cause the suffering we are experiencing. In Luke 13:1-5 Jesus taught that suffering is not always the result of sin. When Jesus commented on two tragedies that took place, he didn't explain why they happened, because we don't often get to find out why suffering occurs. Instead, he said we must all repent so we don't perish eternally.

https://youtu.be/s8ykAvmI8xk
During trials we wonder if we are suffering for sin. In Luke 13:1-5 Jesus taught that suffering is not always the result of sin.

Table of contents* Family Worship Guide for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)* Sermon Notes for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)* Lesson One: Suffering isn’t always the result of sin.* Lesson Two: All suffering is the result of sin.* Lesson Three: We don’t always get to find out why we are suffering.* Lesson Four: We must all repent or perish eternally.

Family Worship Guide for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)

Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions:

* Day 1: Luke 13:1-5—why did the people share this news with Jesus? How would you have expected Jesus to respond if you weren’t familiar with the account? How did he respond and why did he respond this way? How did Jesus elevate these physical accounts to the spiritual level?* Day 2: 1 Peter 2:20, 3:17, 4:15, Hebrews 12:5-6, John 9:1-3, Job 1:8, Hebrews 11:35-37, 2 Corinthians 11:23-28—do you see any similarities between the Tower of Siloam falling and the Twin Towers falling, in particular regarding the way people responded? Besides the examples from these verses can you think of other examples from Scripture of godly people suffering?* Day 3: Job 38-41—what does it mean that all suffering is the result of sin? Why do you think Job didn’t find out why he was suffering? Why didn’t God tell him? How do we know if we are suffering for righteousness’s sake or because of our sin? What did Jesus mean when he said that we must repent or we will perish?

Sermon Notes for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)

The title this morning’s sermon is, “Are We Suffering for Sin?”

On Sunday mornings we’re working our way through Luke’s gospel verse by verse and we find ourselves at Luke 13. We will look at verses one through five.

Many times I have responded to people’s questions by asking them a question. Someone asked me why I do that so frequently and I said, “Why shouldn’t I?”

If you respond to people’s questions by asking a question you shouldn’t feel too bad about it, because Jesus seemed to do the same thing. In these few verses he responds to the news about two calamities, not by explaining what happened, but by asking two questions.

Look with me at verse one…

Luke 13:1 There were some present at that very time who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices.

Instead of simply saying Pilate murdered some Galileans who were offering sacrifices in Jerusalem, he uses this vivid way of describing the violence.