Scott LaPierre Ministries

Scott LaPierre Ministries


In This World You Will Have Trouble, but Take Heart (John 16:33)

January 05, 2023

In John 16:33 Jesus said, "In this world you will have trouble, but take heart." Read or listen to this chapter of Enduring Trials God’s Way to learn what scripture talks about trials and tribulations.

Table of ContentsIn This World You Will Have Trouble, but Take Heart Because God Is SovereignIn This World You Will Have Trouble, So Be PreparedPrepare for Trials by Building During Times of PeaceImagine You're an Athlete or SoldierIn This World You Will Have Trouble, but Take Heart Because God Provides the Greater VictoryDeath Is Our Greatest EnemyThe Danger of Daily TrialsDiscussion Questions

https://youtu.be/27kNQNDk6eU
In John 16:33 Jesus said, "In this world you will have trouble, but take heart." Learn how to prepare for trials and suffering in this life.

In John 16:33 Jesus said, "In this world you will have trouble, but take heart." First Peter 4:12 says, "Beloved, do not think it strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened to you." The New Testament was primarily written in Greek, and the word for “strange” is xenizō. It means, “Surprised, astonished, or shocked.” We should not be surprised, astonished, or shocked by trials; instead, we should expect them. James 1:2 says, “when you fall into various trials…” versus “if you…” We will face trials, and this is a New Testament theme:

Acts 14:22a—“Strengthening the souls of the disciples, exhorting them to continue in the faith, [Paul said], ‘We must through many tribulations enter the kingdom of God.’”

1 Thessalonians 3:3—“No one should be shaken by these afflictions; for you yourselves know that we are appointed to this.”

Even though trials are part of the Christian life, we often question how they could happen to us. We might say, “Why would God let this take place?” We act surprised, astonished, or shocked, but based on Scripture we should say, “Since I know trials are part of the Christian life, how would God have me respond? How can I handle this in a way that glorifies Him?”

We should go through this life with the understanding that all Christians experience trials. People expecting the Christian life to be carefree are in for a shock. This is why it is terrible to tell people, “If you become a Christian, Jesus will make your life wonderful!” When they experience trials, there are only three possibilities:

They will be upset with you later, feeling as though you lied to them.

They will be angry with Jesus for not making their life perfect like you said He would.

They will think Christianity is untrue, telling themselves, “If Jesus were real, He would not have let this happen to me.”

Instead, we need to be honest about trials, encouraging others and ourselves to embrace what Jesus said to His disciples: “In this world you will have trouble, but take heart” (John 16:33).

In This World You Will Have Trouble, but Take Heart Because God Is Sovereign

Even though we should expect trials, we do not know when they will take place, which makes them unpredictable. James 1:2 says, “My brethren, count it all joy when you fall into various trials.” The words “fall into” communicate the unexpected nature of trials. The Greek word for “fall into,” or other translations say, “face,” “meet,” or “encounter,” is peripiptō. It only occurs three times in Scripture and each time it describes something that is unpredictable. The other two occurrences are:

Luke 10:30—“Jesus answered and said, ‘A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among (peripiptō) thieves, who stripped him of his clothing, wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.’”

Acts 27:41a—“Striking (peripiptō) a place where two seas met, they ran the ship aground.”

It was unexpected when thieves robbed the man and when the boat crashed. Unpredictable is a great way to describe trials, but do not misunderstand the words “fall into” and think trials are accidents.


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