Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre

Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre


Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9)

August 16, 2021

We must bear fruit in keeping with repentance. The main point of Luke 13 verses one through five is that we must repent. Jesus says, “You are looking at people who died in these tragedies and asking if they died because they are worse than everyone who lived. Instead, you should ask whether you have repented, because they perished physically, but if you don’t repent you are going to perish spiritually, or eternally.” Then Jesus adds to this in verses six through nine by talking about fruit, because if people have repented they will produce the fruit. John the Baptist said, “Bear fruit in keeping with repentance” (Luke 3, verse). Jesus and John put repenting and bearing fruit together because they go hand-in-hand. Usually when we think of repentance, we think only of stopping. We should also think of starting or producing fruit. This is known as putting off and putting on (Ephesians 4 and Colossians 3).

https://youtu.be/DIMk-VVWYSc
We must bear fruit in keeping with repentance. When we think of repentance, we think only of stopping. We should also think of starting.

Table of contents* Family worship guide for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9) * Sermon notes for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9)* Lesson one: repentance involves stopping and starting.* Lesson two: fruit is an evidence of genuine repentance.* Lesson three: God is patient (part one) so we have time to repent and produce fruit.* Lesson three: God is patient (part two) even when he knows people won’t repent.

Family worship guide for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9)

Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions:

* Day 1: Luke 3:8, Ephesians 4:25-32, Colossians 3:5, 12—Why does repentance involves stopping and starting? Explain putting off and putting on. What are some examples of sins that aren’t listed in Scripture that you would stop, and what are the accompanying behaviors you would put on?* Day 2: Luke 13:6-7, Matthew 13:23, Acts 26:20, Ephesians 5:8-9, Colossians 1:5-6, Hebrews 12:11—Explain the parable of the fig tree, what the different elements represent, and the main point(s). Discuss insincere temporary repentance and sincere lasting repentance. How can we tell the difference between the two? Why is fruit an evidence of genuine repentance?* Day 3: Luke 13:8-9, Matthew 12:20, Leviticus 19:23-25, 2 Peter 3:9, paste that—Why is God patient with us? What happens if we don’t produce fruit, or another way to say it: what does it mean if a person doesn’t produce fruit? Why do you think God is patient with people even when he knows they won’t repent? Can you think of some other examples in Scripture of God being patient with people who did not repent?

Sermon notes for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9)

The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance.”

On Sunday mornings we’re working our way through Luke’s gospel verse by verse and we find ourselves at Luke 13 verses 6 through 9.

Recently I shared with you that while I enjoy going verse by verse, because we look at verses in sections,